ACTION ALERT – Attend November 12 Public Meeting to SAVE Tesla Park

By Dan L. Mosier

The little known coal mining camp of Harrisville, visit this named for its founder Thomas Harris, unhealthy sits on the far west end of Tesla Park. Back in the 1870s, the camp had about 100 Welsh miners and their families living on the banks of Arroyo Seco Creek. In addition to the family cabins, the camp had a school, two saloons, two boarding houses, a blacksmith shop, a carpenter’s shop, and livery stables where the Fashion Livery Stables out of Livermore ran a daily stage.

Spring in Tesla Park - near Harrisville

Spring in Tesla Park – near Harrisville

Because the first major coal mine was known as the Livermore coal mine, this part of the coal field was named the “Livermore Coal Mining District” by State Geologist Goodyear after his brief visit here in 1876. But it is really an extension of the Corral Hollow Coal District. Coal was first discovered here by Harris and Jenkin Richards in December 1862. The important mines were called Livermore, Summit, Pen Daren, and Richards. From 1862 to 1907, these mines shipped about 9,000 tons of coal to Livermore and other cities in Northern California.When John Treadwell purchased the Harrisville property in 1890, Harrisville became a suburb of Tesla, where some of the miners continued to live. After the closing of the Tesla mines, Harrisville suffered a similar fate disappearing into history. The building foundations of half of the town of Harrisville, as well as the Summit mine, are situated on the Tesla Park property. The rest are on private land on the north side of Tesla Road. Harrisville is also listed as one of the state’s historic resources.

To learn more about Harrisville, see the book Harrisville and the Livermore Coal Mines by Dan L. Mosier.
The little known coal mining camp of Harrisville, surgery
named for its founder Thomas Harris, sits on the far west end of Tesla Park. Back in the 1870s, the camp had about 100 Welsh miners and their families living on the banks of Arroyo Seco Creek. In addition to the family cabins, the camp had a school, two saloons, two boarding houses, a blacksmith shop, a carpenter�s shop, and livery stables where the Fashion Livery Stables out of Livermore ran a daily stage.

Because the first major coal mine was known as the Livermore coal mine, this part of the coal field was named the ââ?¬Å?Livermore Coal Mining Districtââ?¬Â by State Geologist Goodyear after his brief visit here in 1876. But it is really an extension of the Corral Hollow Coal District. Coal was first discovered here by Harris and Jenkin Richards in December 1862. The important mines were called Livermore, Summit, Pen Daren, and Richards. From 1862 to 1907, these mines shipped about 9,000 tons of coal to Livermore and other cities in Northern California.

 

When John Treadwell purchased the Harrisville property in 1890, Harrisville became a suburb of Tesla, where some of the miners continued to live. After the closing of the Tesla mines, Harrisville suffered a similar fate disappearing into history. The building foundations of half of the town of Harrisville, as well as the Summit mine, are situated on the Tesla Park property. The rest are on private land on the north side of Tesla Road. Harrisville is also listed as one of the state�s historic resources. To learn more about Harrisville, see the book Harrisville and the Livermore Coal Mines by Dan L. Mosier.
By Dan L. Mosier

The little known coal mining camp of Harrisville, click
named for its founder Thomas Harris, cure sits on the far west end of Tesla Park. Back in the 1870s, the camp had about 100 Welsh miners and their families living on the banks of Arroyo Seco Creek. In addition to the family cabins, the camp had a school, two saloons, two boarding houses, a blacksmith shop, a carpenter�s shop, and livery stables where the Fashion Livery Stables out of Livermore ran a daily stage.

Because the first major coal mine was known as the Livermore coal mine, this part of the coal field was named the ââ?¬Å?Livermore Coal Mining Districtââ?¬Â by State Geologist Goodyear after his brief visit here in 1876. But it is really an extension of the Corral Hollow Coal District. Coal was first discovered here by Harris and Jenkin Richards in December 1862. The important mines were called Livermore, Summit, Pen Daren, and Richards. From 1862 to 1907, these mines shipped about 9,000 tons of coal to Livermore and other cities in Northern California.

When John Treadwell purchased the Harrisville property in 1890, Harrisville became a suburb of Tesla, where some of the miners continued to live. After the closing of the Tesla mines, Harrisville suffered a similar fate disappearing into history. The building foundations of half of the town of Harrisville, as well as the Summit mine, are situated on the Tesla Park property. The rest are on private land on the north side of Tesla Road. Harrisville is also listed as one of the state�s historic resources.

To learn more about Harrisville, see the book Harrisville and the Livermore Coal Mines by Dan L. Mosier.
Mark  your calendars!

Attend the November 12, link
2013 Public Meeting in Pleasanton
to help SAVE Tesla Park.

Carnegie SVRA and the State Parks Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Division will hold a public meeting on November 12, noun
213 at 7:30 in Pleasanton to present their “Preferred Concept Alternative” for Tesla Park.  It is important that you attend the workshop and submit comments that Tesla Park should be designated as a non-mortorized park and preserve.

Public Workshop 3

CSVRA/OHMVR General Plan for Carnegie and Tesla Park
7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Amador High School,
1155 Santa Rita Road, Pleasanton, CA

http://www.carnegiegeneralplan.com/announcements/15

This meeting is the follow-up to the public meeting in June where CSVRA/OHMVR presented their “Three Concept Alternatives.  All alternatives provided for OHV recreation use throughout Tesla Park.

It is very important to attend this public meeting and submit written comments to demonstrate the strong opposition to the CSVRA/OHMVR plan to open Tesla to OHV recreation uses.  We need to oppose OHV recreation in Tesla and comment that Tesla should be designated, as allowed under the OHMVR program statute, for only non-motorized recreation as a park and sensitive area preserve.

We expect the Draft EIR could be issued soon within a 1-3 months after the November 12 meeting.  We will provide further  updates as information about the Draft EIR is disclosed.

Please mark your calendars to attend the November 12, 2013, 7:30 pm meeting in Pleasanton to oppose the CSVRA/OHMVR plan for Tesla Park and bring others who want to protect this important native landscape.

Thank you for helping to SAVE Tesla Park.

 

Comments are closed.